Cycle of Segregation: Social Processes and Residential Stratification

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Russell Sage Foundation #ad - People rely heavily on information from friends, family, and coworkers when choosing where to live. Why does segregation persist at such high rates and what makes it so difficult to combat? In Cycle of Segregation, sociologists Maria Krysan and Kyle Crowder examine how everyday social processes shape residential stratification.

Past neighborhood experiences, social networks, and daily activities all affect the mobility patterns of different racial groups in ways that have cemented segregation as a self-perpetuating cycle in the twenty-first century. The fair housing act of 1968 outlawed housing discrimination by race and provided an important tool for dismantling legal segregation.

They argue that together, such programs can expand the number of destinations available to low-income residents and help offset the negative images many people hold about certain neighborhoods or help introduce them to places they had never considered. The authors suggest that even absent of family ties, and where they work, people gravitate toward neighborhoods that are familiar to them through their past experiences, shop, including where they have previously lived, and spend time.

Cycle of Segregation: Social Processes and Residential Stratification #ad - Cycle of segregation demonstrates why a nuanced understanding of everyday social processes is critical for interrupting entrenched patterns of residential segregation. But almost fifty years later, residential segregation remains virtually unchanged in many metropolitan areas, particularly where large groups of racial and ethnic minorities live.

Because these social networks tend to be racially homogenous, people are likely to receive information primarily from members of their own racial group and move to neighborhoods that are also dominated by their group. Through original analyses of national-level surveys and in-depth interviews with residents of Chicago, Krysan and Crowder find that residential stratification is reinforced through the biases and blind spots that individuals exhibit in their searches for housing.

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Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making Third Edition

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Examples throughout the book have been updated, and the prose has been streamlined to make a great read even better. The most accessible policy text available. Policy making is a political struggle over values and ideas. By exposing the paradoxes that underlie even seemingly straightforward policy decisions, Policy Paradox shows students that politics cannot be cleansed from the process in favor of “rationality.

Author deborah stone has fully revised and updated this popular text, which now includes many paradoxes that have arisen since September 11.

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Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

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University of California Press #ad - My world seems upside down. In lives in Limbo, Roberto G. I have grown up but I feel like I’m moving backward. Mining the results of an extraordinary twelve-year study that followed 150 undocumented young adults in Los Angeles, Lives in Limbo exposes the failures of a system that integrates children into K-12 schools but ultimately denies them the rewards of their labor.

Due to a broken immigration system, they grow up to uncertain futures. Gonzales introduces us to two groups: the college-goers, like gabriel, who failed to make meaningful connections in high school and started navigating dead-end jobs, who had good grades and a strong network of community support that propelled him to college and DREAM Act organizing but still landed in a factory job a few short years after graduation, like Ricardo, immigration checkpoints, and the early-exiters, and a world narrowly circumscribed by legal limitations.

Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America #ad - This vivid ethnography explores why highly educated undocumented youth share similar work and life outcomes with their less-educated peers, despite the fact that higher education is touted as the path to integration and success in America. And i can’t do anything about it. Esperanza over two million of the nation’s eleven million undocumented immigrants have lived in the United States since childhood.

University of California Press.

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Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic

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Bloomsbury Press #ad - Bloomsbury Publishing. Dreamland is a revelatory account of the corrosive threat facing America and its heartland. Meanwhile, independent of any drug cartel--assaulted small town and mid-sized cities across the country, driven by a brilliant, potent, and originating from one small county on Mexico's west coast, a massive influx of black tar heroin--cheap, almost unbeatable marketing and distribution system.

With a great reporter's narrative skill and the storytelling ability of a novelist, acclaimed journalist Sam Quinones weaves together two classic tales of capitalism run amok whose unintentional collision has been catastrophic. University of California Press. How that happened is the riveting story of Dreamland.

Winner of the nbcc award for general nonfictionNamed on Amazon's Best Books of the Year 2015--Michael Botticelli, U. S. The unfettered prescribing of pain medications during the 1990s reached its peak in Purdue Pharma's campaign to market OxyContin, its new, expensive--extremely addictive--miracle painkiller.

Louis post-dispatch's best books of 2015--the guardian's the best book we read all year--audible's best books of 2015--texas Observer's Five Books We Loved in 2015--Chicago Public Library's Best Nonfiction Books of 2015From a small town in Mexico to the boardrooms of Big Pharma to main streets nationwide, an explosive and shocking account of addiction in the heartland of America.

Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic #ad - In 1929, a company built a swimming pool the size of a football field; named Dreamland, Ohio, in the blue-collar city of Portsmouth, it became the vital center of the community. Now, addiction has devastated portsmouth, as it has hundreds of small rural towns and suburbs across America--addiction like no other the country has ever faced.

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Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Patrick sharkey reveals the striking consequences: improved school test scores, since children are better able to learn when not traumatized by nearby violence; better chances that poor children will rise into the middle class; and a striking increase in the life expectancy of African American men. Sharkey also delineates the combination of forces, that brought about safer streets, some positive and some negative, from aggressive policing and mass incarceration to the intensive efforts made by local organizations to confront violence in their own communities.

From new york’s harlem neighborhood to south los angeles, Sharkey draws on original data and textured accounts of neighborhoods across the country to document the most successful proven strategies for combatting violent crime and to lay out innovative and necessary approaches to the problem of violence.

Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence #ad - In many cases, places once characterized by decay and abandonment are now thriving, the fear of death by gunshot wound replaced by concern about skyrocketing rents. In 2014, most U. S. University of California Press. An eye-opening account of the transformation of cities and an urgent call to action to prevent another crime wave.

Over the past two decades, American cities have experienced an astonishing drop in violent crime, dramatically changing urban life.

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Poisoned City

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Picador Paper #ad - Complaints about the foul-smelling water were dismissed: the residents of Flint, mostly poor and African American, were not seen as credible, even in matters of their own lives. It took eighteen months of activism by city residents and a band of dogged outsiders to force the state to admit that the water was poisonous.

It is a chronicle of one town, but could also be about any American city, all made precarious by the neglect of infrastructure and the erosion of democratic decision making. By that time, twelve people had died and Flint’s children had suffered irreparable harm. Places like flint are set up to fail―and for the people who live and work in them, the consequences can be fatal.

The long battle for accountability and a humane response to this man-made disaster has only just begun. In the first full account of this american tragedy, Anna Clark's The Poisoned City recounts the gripping story of Flint’s poisoned water through the people who caused it, suffered from it, and exposed it.

Poisoned City #ad - . Through a series of disastrous decisions, the state government had switched the city’s water supply to a source that corroded Flint’s aging lead pipes. University of California Press. When the people of flint, turned on their faucets in April 2014, Michigan, the water pouring out was poisoned with lead and other toxins.

Bloomsbury Publishing.

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The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

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Liveright #ad - 13 illustrations University of California Press. One of publishers weekly's 10 best books of 2017 longlisted for the National Book AwardThis “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide New York Times Book Review.

Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America #ad - A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history Chicago Daily Observer, The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past. Bloomsbury Publishing. Widely heralded as a “masterful” washington post and “essential” slate history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” William Julius Wilson.

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Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life

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Crown #ad - . The numerous case studies add up to a plea for more investment in the spaces and institutions parks, libraries, childcare centers that foster mutual support in civic life. The new yorker“palaces for the people—the title is taken from the Scottish-American industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s description of the hundreds of libraries he funded—is essentially a calm, lucid exposition of a centuries-old idea, which is really a furious call to action.

New statesman“Clear-eyed. A comprehensive, entertaining, and compelling argument for how rebuilding social infrastructure can help heal divisions in our society and move us forward. Jon stewartnamed one of the best books of the year by npr • “Engaging. Mayor pete buttigieg,  the new york Times Book Review Editors’ ChoiceWe are living in a time of deep divisions.

Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life #ad - Bloomsbury Publishing. But how, can this be done?in Palaces for the People, exactly, Eric Klinenberg suggests a way forward. Americans are sorting themselves along racial, and cultural lines, religious, leading to a level of polarization that the country hasn’t seen since the Civil War. Here, and environmental psychology, drawing on research in urban planning, behavioral economics, as well as on his own fieldwork from around the world, Eric Klinenberg posits that a community’s resilience correlates strongly with the robustness of its social infrastructure.

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Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison

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Russell Sage Foundation #ad - In contrast to the stereotype of tough criminals preying upon helpless citizens, Western shows that many former prisoners were themselves subject to lifetimes of violence and abuse and encountered more violence after leaving prison, blurring the line between victims and perpetrators. Bloomsbury Publishing.

By foregrounding the stories of people struggling against the odds to exit the criminal justice system, Homeward shows how overhauling the process of prisoner reentry and rethinking the foundations of justice policy could address the harms of mass incarceration. Western concludes that boosting the social integration of former prisoners is key to both ameliorating deep disadvantage and strengthening public safety.

Western finds that for most, leaving prison is associated with acute material hardship. In these circumstances, how do former prisoners navigate reentering society? In Homeward, sociologist Bruce Western examines the tumultuous first year after release from prison. In the first year after prison, most respondents could not afford their own housing and relied on family support and government programs, with half living in deep poverty.

Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison #ad - Violence was common in their lives, and often preceded their incarceration. Most respondents were also unemployed. Western and his research team conducted comprehensive interviews with men and women released from the Massachusetts state prison system who returned to neighborhoods around Boston. University of California Press.

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In Harm's Way: The Dynamics of Urban Violence

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Princeton University Press #ad - Homicides―often involving young people―continue to skyrocket, and in the emergency room there, victims of shootings or knifings are an all-too-common sight. They show how the state is complicit in the production of harm, and describe the routines and relationships that residents, particularly children, establish to cope with and respond to the constant risk that besieges them and their loved ones.

Provocative, and extraordinarily moving, eye-opening, In Harm's Way is destined to become a classic work on violence at the urban margins. They argue that being physically aggressive becomes a habitual way of acting in poor and marginalized communities, and that violence is routine and carries across various domains of public and private life.

Bloomsbury Publishing. University of California Press. Arquitecto tucci, a neighborhood in Buenos Aires, is a place where crushing poverty and violent crime are everyday realities. Auyero and berti trace how different types of violence―be it criminal, sexual, intersect, drug related, or domestic―overlap, and blur together.

In Harm's Way: The Dynamics of Urban Violence #ad - In harm's way takes a harrowing look at daily life in Arquitecto Tucci, examining the sources, uses, and forms of interpersonal violence among the urban poor at the very margins of Argentine society. Drawing on more than two years of immersive fieldwork, sociologist Javier Auyero and María Berti, an elementary school teacher in the neighborhood, provide a powerful and disarmingly intimate account of what it is like to live under the constant threat of violence.

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The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

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Liveright #ad - Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. The american landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book” Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, as Rothstein’s invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.

While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Now, rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America #ad - Finally, rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The fair housing act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Richard rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation; it was actually de jure segregation.

13 illustrations University of California Press. Rather, state, the color of law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

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